SiOE Doctoral Conference 2016 Comic Abstract

Very much looking forward to presenting at Sheffield Institute of Education’s Second Doctoral Conference on 5th November. As well as the text only version of the abstract I also put together the following comic strip version, which seemed appropriate given the focus of the talk.

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The conference website is here: http://iguest2.wixsite.com/sioedocconf2016

Expanding the Limits of Participatory Analysis: Forthcoming Workshop

Expanding the Limits of Participatory Analysis: New Ways of Seeing and Knowing.

I will be be discussing comics as a participatory methodology as part of a workshop at the Royal Geographical Societies International conference on 31st August – more details below:

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On Wednesday 31st August, at the 2016 Royal Geographies Society Annual International Conference, I will be jointly conducting a Participatory Geographies Research Group (PyGyRg) sponsored workshop on the use of visual, participatory methods at the conference with colleagues Larissa Povey (2) and Kiri Langmead (3). Details below:

Abstract: Discussing their use of participatory visual methods, Guillemin and Drew (2010, p.184) suggest that ‘participants, as producers of the image are the most […] appropriate persons to give meaning to the image.’  While aligning with the reflexive epistemologies of participatory methods, how to engage participants in analysis and how to balance this engagement with researchers’ own analytical endeavours demands further investigation.

Understanding analysis to be woven through the whole research process, the session will discuss and critique three approaches to participatory analysis: (1) the use of comic strips in the analysis of children’s engagement in collaborative video game play; (2) the use of photo-elicitation in analysing women’s experiences of conditionality and punishment; and (3) the use of narrative and ‘resonance response’ in the analysis of cooperative members understandings of work and economy.

In the spirit of PyGyRg, and recognising the need for critique and debate, the session will be structured to ‘promote openness and fluidity and not to ‘police the boundaries’ (Wynne-Jones, 2015) around what is and what is not participatory analysis.  To this end, the session will follow the format of the third approach, enabling attendees to reflect on past and lived experiences of participatory analysis through direct engagement.

Session outline: In the first 30 minutes of the session, the three researchers will present their experiences of participatory analysis as outlined in the abstract.  Attendees will be asked to listen and note down on post-it notes: any points that resonate with, challenge or contradict their own experiences; points they find interesting or problematic; and any questions.  Attendees will then be asked (as a whole group or in smaller groups of 10, depending on attendance) to share and group their notes into themes.  These themes will form a framework of a 30-40 minute discussion, exploring the challenges and potential of participatory analysis.

On Life / On Play

After a few weeks of seemingly non-stop conferences and talks (Sheffield Uni, Lancaster, Sheffield Uni again and finally Bristol, for the UKLA) I am finally back to working on my thesis, drawing things together and making plans to move on to other things. All busy but all good.

Apropos of nothing much, here’s a tiny, handheld extract…

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Comic Explorations Presentation

I had a great day yesterday at Sheffield University’s Literacies conference, which is always a brilliant event full of fascinating and generous people. Looking forward to the second day today. Here are (most of) the slides from my presentation…

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Comic Explorations: Representing data and visualising complexity in multi-sited, multimodal research

Abstract:

In this presentation I relate a number of ways in which comic strips were used as methodological tools during an ethnographic study of a children’s after-school Minecraft club. This longitudinal research project sought to examine the ‘lived experience’ of a group of participants engaged in collaborative videogame play using this popular world-building game; this included a focus on how players’ identities were explored and expressed in a complex space that enabled multimodal and multi-sited interactions. As the children played and worked collaboratively to construct a ‘virtual community’, a range of visual and participatory methods were used to generate data; this included participants’ use of a GoPro action camera, discussion sessions where players talked whilst constructing virtual ‘identity models’, screencasts of gameplay on multiple screens and photographs of the action in the room. Faced with the dilemma of how to represent this complex data in a way that felt ‘true’ to the original context, comic strips were employed as a medium that enabled multimodal transcription; using a combination of data from the multiple on- and off-screen sources, theses constructed narratives allowed me to take account of the children’s actions as well as their spoken interactions.

Drawing on the rich data generated during this project, I show how these comic strip transcriptions were constructed and how they contributed to an emerging process of data analysis. In addition, building on recent work around the affordances of visual methodologies in literacies research, I explain how I also used illustrated comic strips as a means of developing thought and illuminating ideas. I will demonstrate how these different types of comic strip were included in the final account of the project, helping the reader to visualise the data, whilst also revealing the process of analysis that led to the project’s findings.  As well as considering how this methodological approach helped to explore and represent the identities of participants, I also show how this process of experimentation with emergent visual research methodologies helped to expand my own thinking, therefore reflecting on how this approach impacted on my own identity as a researcher.

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Minecraft Design Sessions at Games Britannia

I will be running two ‘Minecraft Design’ sessions for KS 3 children at this year’s Games Britannia Video Games Ed Festival at Sheffield Hallam University. More details here:

Minecraft Design Creating 3D Virtual Worlds (Half day workshop)

For: KS3 pupils interested in exploring the exciting world of Minecraft! Minecraft is a world-wide phenomenon which needs little introduction, but has endless possibilities for creative use.

Few are more aware of these creative possibilities than Chris Bailey, a former schoolteacher who is exploring the children’s participation in collaborative virtual play as part of his PhD research. Chris runs a regular Minecraft club as part of this research, and this workshop will build upon his research findings to ensure that participants get the most out the session.

Session 1: 10am-12pm on Thursday 9 th June 16

Session 2: 1pm-3pm on Thursday 9 th June 16

 

http://www.gamesbritannia.com/

Graphic Scholarship Symposium

 

Graphic Scholarship Sympos

Excited to be presenting here later in the year.

https://britishcomicsscholars.wordpress.com

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/bccs-comics-scholarship-symposium-tickets-23847434318